Tactics

What Canada Taught Me About Fishing

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Canada knows how to do sunsets…even if they aren’t until 11:30pm

A long time bucket list of mine had been to participate in a  fly-in fishing trip to northern Canada, and in the early part of June last year, I was able to finally check it off.  If you are unfamiliar with these endeavors, they are all pretty much the same concept.  Drive as far north into Canada that roads will take you, hop on a float plane to any of the hundred remote outpost camps on any of the million lakes up there and start fishing.  As long as you can keep from being devoured by a  bear, trampled by a moose or suffocated by a swarm of ruthless, evil, hate filled bugs…you will no doubt catch more fish than you can possibly imagine.  Besides the obvious appeal of fishing for a week straight, the biggest pull for me was how remote these locations are.  You’re out on your own, miles and miles from civilization, surviving off only the gear you bring in and the game you catch (sorry…no “keep em’ wet” happening there) all the while taking in nature that hasn’t been completely altered or trodden over by a herd of humans every weekend.  It was an awesome experience that I would repeat in a heartbeat with the only negative memory being those damn bugs (pro tip: don’t let them get INSIDE your bug suit…nightmares).  But as the resident new guy on this blog, I thought I’d share one of the things I’d do differently if I were to partake in such an adventure again; my approach and plan for catching fish.  I’ll break it out for you.

Where we were fishing:

As with the vast majority of water in northern Canada, the two major species we would be pursuing (and living off of) were walleye and pike, of which I have very little experience fishing for. The particular body of water we were on consisted of a decent sized river opening up to a 7 mile by half mile lake with two other rivers that exited on the other side.  Our outpost was located at the mouth of the river feeding in, and I was told that we would be spending most of our time around there for walleye and in the river and its tributaries for pike.  The walleye were known to hang by structure in water anywhere from 10 to 20ft with pike patrolling the edges and shallow tributaries.  We also would be taking a crazy adventurous day trip, 15 miles up river to a set of falls that are known for holding monster brook trout (trout rule, ‘eyes drool!).

How I planned on catching fish:

At the point I was planning for this trip, I had fully converted my fishing techniques to the fly and had all but rid myself of anything img_2612relating to gear fishing.  I knew pike would be easy.  I would treat them like hyper aggressive trout, slap some wire on the end of my leader and throw big, gaudy streamers at them.  Walleye were another story.  They aren’t known to be a regular target for most fly fisherman and finding large quantities of information on how to go about it was difficult.  But the Internet is full of crazy people like myself and I was able to find enough articles to put a plan in place. My idea was this:  I’d set up an 8/9wt rig with a long-headed 300gr sink tip line and tie up a bunch of weighted
leech and clouser patterns with colors ranging from black/purple to chartreuse/orange.  I figured that if after I cast out as far as I could, I gave the fly ample time to sink before slowly stripping it in, I’d be close enough to the target depth to get in walleye range. Solid plan right?  I should note, my father-in-law, who has been on countless number of trips to this lake, and would be with me on this one, thought I was a fool to only bring a fly rod.  So much so, that he went out and bought me a spinning gear combo package so that I’d be guilt ridden into bringing gear with me.  He wasn’t taking any chances as I’d be part of the equation of whether he ate dinner or not each night.  What’s that they say about listening to those that have gone before you in life?

How it turned out:

Yea…not nearly as well as I thought and I was grateful for that spinning gear.  The big thing I forgot to factor in was that I’m a novice who, at the time, couldn’t cast to save his life (an accurate metaphor given the circumstances) nor understood the fish or environment I was fishing in.  Let’s break this down:

-When you are a very inefficient at casting, a 300gr line with heavy flies is not only a bear to control, but will wear you out lickety split.  Add in that I’m a walking stick figure with a career that emphasizes typing speeds over strength, and I was well worn out after a full day behind my rig.  This made my accuracy and distance garbage and I spent more time out of the fishy zone than in it.

-I was the only guy using a fly rod.  And since piloting an outboard powered boat is near impossible while casting one, that meant the speed and positioning of said boat was almost always in favor of the hardware guys.  When trolling, I couldn’t cast fast enough to accurately hit my zones or keep my fly deep enough if we were in walleye territory.  When holding still, we were usually out far enough that I had to muster up monster casts to get to where the fish were.  Again, my weak casting did not help me here.  We had a 5th guy lined up to go with us that is a fantastic fly fisherman which, had he not had to bail at the last second, would have made this a moot point.  But if if’s and but’s were candy and nuts, oh what a Christmas it would be.  I was going to a camp designed around hardware…not sure what I expected.

-I didn’t tie nearly as flashy patterns as I should have.  The water levels were abnormally high and strong winds had the water very cloudy.  I obviously could not have predicted this, but you should prepare for everything on a trip like this.  The only places I had any success were in the tributaries were the water was clear or low.  But the name of the game that week was either motion (more than an articulated streamer can provide) or flash, neither of which my patterns overly excelled at.  This was the most obvious the day we spent at the falls.  I was the first in the water and on my fourth cast landed a real nice brookie on a white boogieman pattern.  At last, I thought, it’s my time to shine!  That was the last fish I caught that day.  My boogieman was crusty leftovers in the eyes of the trout once they saw the Mepp’s my uncle’s were throwing.  And they could cast them farther and faster than I could ever dream of.  They put up some impressive numbers of some of the biggest brook trout I’ve seen and left me with my one measly fish and a sore shoulder on the boat ride home.

Did I catch fish on my fly rod?  Is the pope catholic?  I hooked up with plenty of hammer

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Probably one of the smallest…but the one I’m most proud of!

handled size pike and even proved my theory correct with a few walleye.  But I had to work my butt off to get them while my companions were kicked back slaying them one after another (literally) with spinning gear.  And believe me…they let me know it.  I eventually gave up and just switched to my spinning rod.  I still refused to jig or troll…what a boring and uninvolved means of fishing.  But I ended up having a fantastic time ripping stick baits for pike and spoons or spinners for walleyes and ended up with the record for most consecutive fish per cast by going 10 for 10 on pike one night.  Quick side note here…the pike in that lake were some of the most aggressive, brutal predators I’ve seen.  If it moved, it was food.  They would come up and take chunks out of walleye we had on stringers and I swear to you, one even smashed a Rapala that was covered in a foot of weeds.  Made for some fun times…but nature, you scary….

 

What I’d do differently:

Obviously, get better at casting.  It’s coming up on a year since that trip and although I’m far from being Paul Maclean, I’ve made big improvements in this category thanks to some relentless backyard practicing and some great guidance from a friend.  I also think I’d upgrade my fly rod. Over the summer I switched my Redington Crosswater 6wt over to a Mystic Reaper and it made a world of difference in my casting, especially for large streamers.  I think if I did the same for my big streamer rod (combined with even more practice) I’d have a better time at it.  But maybe I’m just looking for an excuse to have three Reapers in my collection.  Also, I think I’d focus all time with my fly rod on hunting trophy pike and just be happy if a walleye randomly hits my fly.  For walleye, I’d upgrade my spinning gear, chuck heavy spinners with ease and be happy doing it.  Or pack in some steaks and leave the monotonous task of working a jig to others.  Finally, I’d bring along a better assortment of flies.  And I’m not talking about anything super fancy here…did you read the part about that pike hitting a grass covered lure?  But maybe a little something more to get their attention and mix it up like some floating frog/mouse patterns or a pack of flashabou tied to a hook.  That’d get it done.

So at the end of it all, these shortcomings with my fishing strategy by no means took away from an awesome trip.  For that matter, it’s made me realize that living in Michigan, I’m limiting myself…just a bit…by swearing off gear fishing for life.  The fall salmon run for instance has all be written off for me since I’ve given up the ol’ chuck n’ duck.  So I think this September, IF the salmon come back up the river and I have an opportunity to get in there and battle it out, I’ll be throwing plugs and hot n’ tots instead of streamers and eggs.  OK no joke…it was really hard to type that.  But I’m trying to be open-minded and I promise I won’t be petitioning for this blog to be renamed michiganflyandgear.com.  Fly or die people.  But, in the meantime, I’m going to go look at pictures of steelhead sized brook trout, Bob Ross level Canadian sunsets and Fireball stealing in-laws to remind me of an incredibly memorable trip…and to keep practicing casting.  So hey ya’ hosers, keep some tight lines eh?

 


We’re Back…….

 

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The very first post written on MichiganFly was published on Jan 9th, 2014 – 3 years ago today.  That Michigan winter was especially brutal, temps that reached a high in the single digits for several days in a row and snow that was measured in feet instead of inches.  Dan and I started this as a coping method as we searched for any crutch available to maintain the level mental sanity we both had.  Luckily for us, jumping on the internet and acting like clowns worked to the degree that we didn’t have to resort to our final plan that involved tons of drugs and booze.

We decided at the time that we would operate the blog through the winter months, then bail out of it when time no longer permitted, usually signaled by the polar bears and penguins migrating back to more permanent arctic lands.  So……..we’re back for the next couple of months.  Who’s ready for Tuesday bananas?

2016 was a good year – they are all pretty damned good if you have a group of friends that you spend time with on the water.  Here’s a the start of a brief recap:

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Instead of typing some BS that nobody wants to read here, a video recap is probably better.

A few trout a few steelhead, nothing wrong with that.  Then towards the latter half of spring, something happened that….that changed everything forever.  In our circle a 20″ trout is usually referenced as a “good fish”, anything over 24″ becomes a “giant” and if you topple the 27″ mark, something that has been done once by Jeff (see his work at  Fly Fish the Mitt) its legendary status.

Well, Dan (MichiganFly co-founder) didn’t just set a new bar this year, he took the old one, broke it and shoved it up everyone’s rears.  Never in my lifetime did I expect to witness a 30″ resident brown trout being put into the net – but it happened.

The fish ate a fly of Dan’s own design – the Mitt Fiddle.  Guess what bug got fished by everyone else a lot for the rest of the year?

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Personally, I was on the struggle bus a bit streamer fishing this past spring.  I had a number of opportunities at good fish maybe even a few giants in there – but usually I had my head up my ass and completely blew the chance.  Definitely, something that will be addressed this year.  I don’t know – is there some surgical procedure or something to remove craniums from rectums?

Rest of the year recap to come soon.  Tune in tomorrow for the 1st Tuesday Bananas of the year!


2016 B1F – Chase for the Duke & Lily Cup

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Springing Into Action, Pre­Spawn Smallmouth Bass on the Fly

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Today’s feature is from Kory Boozer, SW Michigan and Smallmouth guide extraordinaire.  CLICK HERE to see more info about Kory and how to book a trip to elevate your Smallmouth game.

When fly fisherman think of Smallmouth Bass in Michigan, they think of hot Summer days spent tossing poppers at the rivers edge and while this is a great time of year to pursue Smallmouth Bass, it is far from the only time of year fly fisherman can enjoy chasing these river assassins.

While many anglers are still chasing Steelhead or Brown Trout on Michigan’s Rivers, Smallies begin to put on one of the biggest feeding binges of the year, typically once the water temps reach the mid to upper 40’s is when you will begin noticing a sharp increase in activity. They have yet to vacate their Winter holding lies and are still congregated in large groups which means if you find them you can typically catch a bunch of them. Look for fish to hold in deeper water in slack water areas, such as natural wing dams, sharp drop offs in the river bottom, eddies, etc… Any area that provides baitfish, slack current and deeper  water with access to spawning habitat nearby while retaining access to food is the ticket.

The results of properly matching the fly to the most abundant forage.

The results of properly matching the fly to the most abundant forage.

As far as gear goes, this isn’t time to fish floating lines and light weight rods, I recommend Scientific Anglers Sonar lines in the 250-350 grain range depending on the rod you are using. Some days you simply need to get down deep and I will throw a 9 wt and 350 grain line. As the water warms fishing deeper water becomes less and less of a necessity though and for the most part 7 and 8 wt rods are all you need. When you fish weightless flies as I do a heavier line is necessary to get them down, lucky for us a good sized Smallie will fold a 7, 8 or even a 9 wt to the cork. You do not want to fish large streamers, even if you are targeting big fish, streamers roughly 3″ – 4″ in length are ideal to properly match the forage at that time of year. Fish them slow with short and fast strips to provoke reaction bites, some times very slowly swinging through an area with minimal action is ideal, others they want more action, this can vary by the hour so something you want to continuously play with to maximize your effectiveness.

Releasing a chunky pre-spawn Smallmouth Bass.

Releasing a chunky pre-spawn Smallmouth Bass.

Fly choices are dictated by the most available forage where you are fishing. For example if Chubs, Suckers or Gobies are the dominate food source where you are fishing, you want to match the colors, size and flash these bait fish give off as closely as possible. If young Trout & Salmon or Shad are the most abundant food source in the area, then that is the type of forage you want to mimic. A flies effectiveness for Smallmouth Bass is measured by how much motion they provide without movement, how closely the color and flash matches the natural forage and how fast and cheap I can tie the fly in my opinion. I want a fly that swims without being stripped, matches the size, hue and flash of the naturals while being slightly transparent and one that I can tie reasonably fast. I also when possible want it to be cheap so I don’t mind losing them and will fish them like I stole `em so to speak. You can basically get away with 3 flies, a white/grey hue, an olive hue and a brown hue, which would do a good job of matching everything from Shad, Baby Bass, Sculpins, Gobies, Suckers, Shiners, etc… A pattern called the Bad Hair Day, developed by my Friend and Wisconsin fly fishing guide Dave Pinczkowski is a great starting point for flies emulating anything in the baitfish form. It utilizes craft fur which is cheap yet has amazing action in the water, various types of flash and wool or dubbing as a head. Simple, Cheap and Effective… Simply match the materials you are tying with to the forage you are imitating, and get started.

A group of Bad Hair Day streamers tied in various colors to suit a variety of conditions.

A group of Bad Hair Day streamers tied in various colors to suit a variety of conditions.

The pre-spawn bite will vary in duration, typically it takes place until water temps reach the mid to upper 50’s and the fish begin to spawn. Depending on weather and location, that can lead to a vastly different window of opportunity. If your into hard fighting fish and don’t like fishing around heavily pressured areas, early Spring Smallmouth Bass might be just the thing for you!

Kory Boozer – Boozer’s Guide Service – www.BoozersGuideService.com

 


Damsel Madness

A couple years ago I was on a streamer trip with friend Joe Donati.   It was a day in late May and the weather was warm and overcast with water a bit up and stained, perfect for pulling bugs.  Joe had landed a few nice trout and we came into a straightaway with grass tight to the bank.  I was rowing and Joe noticed a trout shoot completely out of the water for some right along the bank.  We dropped anchor mid-river and watched for a bit as more fish along the bank proceeded to come flying out of the water with reckless abandon.  We soon realized they were going after damsels hovering near the grass.  We sat there for a while just watching one after another taking shots at these bugs that were obviously driving the trout mad.  Neither of us had anything remotely similar to a damsel so Joe just went with a hopper pattern and was able to get one to go.  I took some video that really doesn’t do the moment justice  but worth sharing.

After telling Bob this story that evening he laughed and said that he’d just taken the two or three damsels he had parked in his dry fly box out because he never thought he’d get a shot at fishing them.

If you’ve been living off the grid for the past couple years and haven’t seen this amazing video of trout crashing damsels then check this out.


The Ones that Keep Me Coming Back

Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught.  ~Author Unknown

Far more often than any of us would like fishing outings conclude with thoughts of “what the hell happened” or “what went wrong” instead of the glorious celebratory end to the day that we all yearn for.  As I look back upon my past few years pulling streamers I have experienced a fair amount of success and have been fortunate to come face to face with a number of quality trout.

Thats all fine and dandy, and I feel honored to have been able to put a fish in the net – but thats not what drives me.  I am unequivocally motivated by the fish that I had brief encounters with.  Those ones that showed themselves in a lightening quick flash as soon as my streamer descended into their habitation OR the ones that charged the stripped bug all the way to the boat and inexplicably turned away without commitment OR (and the worst ones of all) those fish that ate or tried to eat and in a fit of excitement and stupidity I trout set the shit out of and they quickly came unpinned.

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I spend way more time than I should trying to figure out how to elicit a reaction from a predatory fish with a brain the size of a dime.  I lose sleep at night because of it.  It’s a sickness in which there are only 2 cures – more whiskey than my bank account could afford or more time spent on the water.  The biggest problem is, far more times than not I have a brief encounter with a fish that undoubtedly in my mind looks somewhere in the neighborhood of 2-3 times larger than it really is if I were to actually catch it and get a tape on it.  The fish that we don’t catch seem to always be potential record breakers that would land us piles of “thumbs up” on Facebook, never before seen levels of street cred, piles of endorsement, and an endless stream of friend requests from women not trying to sell us Oakley sunglasses (seriously, what’s up with that on Facebook right now?).

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The persistent challenge that exists of cracking the code of trout drives me.  If it were easy I don’t think I would do it as much.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m certainly not saying that if I had the ability or opportunity to walk out my door and start railing 30″ giant browns one after another any day of the week, that I wouldn’t do it.  Of course I would – I’d also probably be unemployed.  What I’m getting at is that the ever changing challenge of catching these fish on streamers is what gets me going.  If I could go out and rail 30″ giants, I wouldn’t feel the need to devote so much time and energy into figuring this stuff out.

The sad fact of this is….this is a game you can never really win.  There will be days that you are ahead in the score column, but in the end the fish will always be victorious more times than not.  So, the reality of this is I’m going to spend an enormous portion of my adult life trying to win at a game that is impossible to win.  Sounds like a great plan to me.


Warmwater Thoughts

Michigan differs from most other states that have a trout oriented fishery, unlike the landlocked states of the Rocky Mountain west we are fortunate to have a migratory fishery available to us.  Another often overlooked opportunity to enjoy the bountiful resources in our state is targeting warm water fish.

This year I plan to spend a considerable amount of time pursuing bass, pike, and pan fish in many of the lakes that are in my immediate geographical area.  Instead of settling into the same routine of summer which is smallmouth bass fishing every weekend, I’m excited about learning something completely new and different.

I’ve made the statement several times over, that “if you put me in a lake, you might as well blindfold me because I don’t have a clue what I’m doing.”  I said that to my wife not so long ago – and she surprised me with a guide that focuses solely on the lakes in our region.

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Doing a fair bit of research between this guide and the internet, has more than peaked my interest this year – it has me really excited.  I’m completely engulfed right now with gathering as much knowledge as possible to learn about how to fish these resources.  Another exciting component is that while my normal trout/bass streamers will most likely work just fine, I have enjoyed seeking out new patterns to tie.

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While I’ll always be a trout streamer and steelhead nympher first – finding a new way to further immerse myself in the sport isn’t a bad thing.


The All-Encompassing

This weekend I was fortunate to spend time on the river with friends.  Erich from Nomad Anglers is a dude that I’ve only fished with a few times, but have had frequent interactions with both in the shop and online, he, Dan and I pursued steelhead for the day enjoying the last sliver of decent weather before the inevitable yearly winter lock down.

One of my favorite aspects of fishing is the relationships that are made and the resulting conversations that are had.  Erich made a comment that really resonated with me and provided a really interesting perspective that triggered me to really think about why fly fishing is so unique in relation to other hobbies and pursuits.  It’s obvious the we start fishing for the fish, but soon realize its about way more than that – the fish are just the medium that binds it all together.

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  1. This one is obvious, fly fishing connects you to nature and allows for you to get outdoors and enjoy wildlife and experiences you otherwise wouldn’t be able to.
  2. It’s something that requires an enormous amount of concentration.  Everything related to fly fishing demands substantial amounts of attention.  Casting, tying flies, reading water, rowing a boat, fighting a fish, crossing a stream, tying knots – none are simply mindless activities that require little to no focus.   The devil is in the details, the extreme focus on any task associated with fly fishing provides us with a significant respite from dedication of brain function directed towards work or problems or whatever is weighing us down at any given time.
  3. You can do something fly fishing related all year long.  Today my face hurts when I go outside because of the cold burn of the January air and it looks like I live in a recently shaken snow globe……but I still was able to “escape” by tying flies.  How many golfers out there?  What did you do today in Michigan?  Probably not golf eh?  We have the luxury of still continuing our pursuit by tying flies, organizing materials, building rods, or patching up leaky waders (a once a month routine for some).
  4. The connection to people that you normally would have no connection to.  Fly fishing is something that is enjoyed by people from an enormous range of social and economical situations.  It’s a common interest that links blue collar works with CEO’s of corporations and college students with retirees.  The diversity of the people that share fly fishing and the resulting network of connections that would normally not exist is amazing.
  5. It allows us to maintain a respective level of competitiveness.  As a former athlete a strong desire to compete is part of my being, it’s something that is so strongly engrained in me that it will never cease to exist.   Fly fishing allows for me to maintain a healthy level of competition, I compete with myself and others.  When someone within my circle catches a big fish – I want to catch one bigger!  When someone ties a great new fly pattern, I want to come up with something better.
  6. There is the availability of varying degrees of difficulty.  Fly fishing has an endless amount of levels of degree of difficulty from the different tactics to species we pursue.  Challenges abound.  Because of the substantial challenges associated with fly fishing the learning will never end.  There will forever be something that can be learned in the many different aspects associated with fly fishing.

“To go fishing is the chance to wash one’s soul with pure air, with the rush of the brook, or with the shimmer of sun on blue water. It brings meekness and inspiration from the decency of nature, charity toward tackle-makers, patience toward fish, a mockery of profits and egos, a quieting of hate, a rejoicing that you do not have to decide a darned thing until next week. And it is discipline in the equality of men – for all men are equal before fish.”
~ Herbert Hoover


The Streamer Salesman

In my latest readings of the book by Jason Randall, titled Trout Sense, a work that is subtitled “A Fly fisher’s guide to What Trout SEE, HEAR, & SMELL” the author draws an extremely interesting comparison.  He compares fly fishermen in a sense to door to door salesmen – putting the entire act of chasing trout on the fly into an entirely new perspective.  He writes:

We are marketing our wares to a skeptical consumer, one that is often not quite convinced it wants what we are selling.  To help us make the sale, we need the equivalent of market analysis.  A good salesman considers two things: the target audience and how the product appeals to the target audience.

Simply put, what can we do as anglers to cause an “EAT” reaction, instead of “DON’T EAT” response?  With streamer fishing we are knocking on a lot of doors throughout the day – there are a extreme multitude of factors that play into enticing an “EAT” response that we must consider.

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Size, shape, and color of the streamer often times plays an extremely important role in triggering a desirable response.  Does the pattern that we are presenting to our ‘customers’ match or resemble what they want to ‘buy’?  Also, action of the streamer plays an enormous role – does the pattern move or act like potential prey?  Does the fly act like a fleeing or injured food item, making it an easy target?

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The product that we are selling is ENORMOUSLY important – as any salesman will tell you, if you don’t have a good product that is marketable, it makes selling it much more difficult.  However, I’d argue that at the very least equally important to the product – probably even more important – is the number of doors we are knocking on.  In many sales type roles, it becomes a numbers game, streamer fishing is not any different.  Simply put, the more doors you knock on the better your chances to make a sale.  Even if your product is not the perfect offering, if you present it to enough fish the odds tip in your favor.

Get your bugs in the water and pull them around…..the more times the better.  Don’t waste time making several false casts, don’t get caught up with frequent bug changes, and don’t waste time doing other things that prevent your flies from being in the water.


GISS

“Trout are either self-aware, intelligent, rational, educated, cunning, suspicious, choosy, fickle, fussy about what they eat, and are increasingly wise to our tricks – or they’re not.”    -Bob Wyatt, “What Trout Want”

There are possibly hundreds of books and thousands of articles that go to great lengths to describe how ‘selective’ and picky of eaters trout are.  There are essentially 2 camps of thought as it regards the feeding habits of trout and the effect that has on the fly fishing world and it’s approach to catching them.  Camp #1 is that trout are highly selective creatures that have the ability to cognitively reason through their meal selection, thus making them (most of the time) very discerning eaters that often  refuse an artificial offering in the form of a fly because it does not look exactly like ‘real food’.  Camp #2 is more in the mindset that trout have to eat to survive and thus do not have the luxury of being uber picky eaters, while they will indeed become keyed in on a singular food source (hatches), they will gladly eat anything that mimics the general impression, shape, and size (GISS) of the food source they are keyed in on.

Looks like a lot of potential different types of bait fish for a trout

Selectivity vs Non-Selectivity is like politics, you are going to get people that are extremely passionate about their beliefs on both sides – and they usually will not agree with each other on most issues.  I know some folks that are thought leaders in the Selectivity camp, and they are some of the best fishermen in the world.  Likewise, I know folks in the Non-selectivity camp that are also some of the best fishermen in the world.

For me, I believe that I fall to the right of the Selectivity crowd, and firmly in the Non-Selectivity belief.  I have seen too many times where fish that are feeding on (name your mayfly hatch here), but those exact same fish are happy to take a parachute adams that fits within the GISS theory.  Think about many of the classic, time tested, proven fly patterns – Adams, Royal Coachman, Wooly Bugger, Hare’s Ear, Pheasant Tail, and others – what are they tied to 100% accurately represent?  The answer to that is EVERYTHING!

Finding the proper angle to present the fly is perhaps most important

The arguement that those in the non-selective group would make is that, as long as your fly falls in the framework of the GISS philosophy, the most important thing is the presentation of that artificial to a trout.  Finding a way to present your artificial in a manner that accurately simulates how natural food sources is more important than poorly presenting the fish with an accurate representation of a meal.

Essentially, better flies won’t make you a better fisherman – but, better presentation will.


Faith is Better than Hope

Nearly 1 full year ago I picked up a book from Glen Blackwood, owner of Great Lakes Fly Fishing Company.  He highly recommended this particular read as a counterpoint to many of the other recently published writings that highlighted fish, trout specifically, as highly intelligent and evolved beings capable of semi-cognitive reasoning.  The book is called What Trout Want (Link to Amazon for more info).

While I’m no where near completion of the book, I already have plans to re-read most if not all of the sections presented as it is certainly a very different perspective than we as fly fishermen have grown accustomed to.  The author of this work is Bob Wyatt – and simply put he states that trout, while indeed highly evolved creatures, are still trout and they have no idea of what is going on in the world outside of their watery ecosystems.  He goes on to explain that trout are unlike humans in many ways – most significantly that their consumption of food is solely for survival, not pleasure.  Therefore, unlike most theories – trout are not as discerning consumers as we’d often paint them to be.

To be fair there is a helluva lot more thought and development that goes into that philosophy, certainly more than I’m capable of writing out here.  However, there is one thing that I read yesterday that really struck me and made me really start to re-think my thought process when fishing, in particular when pulling streamers for trout – “FAITH IS BETTER THAN HOPE”.

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Fishing, whether it’s floating a dry fly past rising trout, indicator fishing for steelhead, casting 1,000,000 repetitive times for musky, or pulling streamers in moving water for trout, is a lot about confidence.  If you are fishing with confidence, you are fishing to the best of your ability.

How many times have you caught yourself saying “I hope the fish are feeding today” or “I hope we hit a bite window” or “I hope we find some players” or “I hope that we see some action”?  Hope is not faith.   Fish are going to be feeding – thats what they do, they have to.

Just because they are not reacting in a desirable fashion to your offering, does not mean that they are not willing to eat at all that day.  All it means is that you are not giving them the type or size of food they are interested in, in the fashion that they are keyed into.

Not a giant, but went a LONG WAYS in renewing the faith that fish would eat a streamer in 33° water.

Not a giant, but went a LONG WAYS in renewing the faith that fish would eat a streamer in 33° water.

Have faith that the fish are willing participants, change your perspective and your success rates will probably change as well.  Know that fish are going to eat at some point during the day – it maybe only for a short window, or it maybe a causual all day grazing.  Understand that it is up to you to figure out what they want and how to best present it.   Keeping the faith that ‘something’ can happen at anytime will make for a more enjoyable day for you and everyone else in your boat, and will lead to more success.

For more thought provoking ideas, look up What Trout Want – please be sure to check with your local Fly Shops first.


Rowing the Boat

I think there are two types of people in this world, those who enjoy rowing and those who put up with the task until they can get off the sticks. I’ll admit it, I like to row. It may sound strange to those unaccustomed to fly fishing but casting from a boat floating down a river requires constant focus and attention. Reading upcoming water, thinking about presentation, considering changing out the bug, trying to keep line from catching on that damn boat bag zipper again, critiquing the last cast, and about 100 other thoughts are incessantly zipping around in my head. In the rowers seat I’m able to appreciate the river, unwind, and maybe have an occasional cigar. My reaction to seeing a bald eagle is totally different in the seat compared to when I’m fishing which is just a quick glance and the obligatory “we’re in luck now fellas”.

I enjoy the challenge of putting friends at that perfect distance where the boat isn’t likely to spook fish yet not making them struggle with long casts they can’t consistently deliver. Alternately, I hate the feeling when I blow it and have the boat on the wrong line or completely forget about the glass eating boulder at the head of a run. The process of successfully hooking and landing a solid fish is heavily dependent on the rower. The mayhem of the fight is way more intense when the rower is not doing his part in the job. I have the opportunity to fish with some guys that are very good at the task of rowing. What strikes me the most about how they go about it is that I don’t think about boat position while they are on the sticks.

Take some time to improve your game in the rower seat. Put some effort into giving your casters their best opportunity to hook up. Your friends will appreciate the effort and maybe put a few in the boat worth remembering years down the road.

Mio


Transition Water (TR Follow up)

The water during Saturday’s trip was still brutally cold, still sporting abnormally low temperatures this close to spring.  After my initial assessment of the water temps, I made the conscious decision to focus all of my efforts on the slower water that is typically associated with winter type fishing.  I determined that even though we are nearing what is in a typical year the peak of the spawning activity, because of the lower temps fish would be less likely to have moved into their traditional transition type water.

While we were able to find several fish in water that was walking speed or less, near the end of the day Joe and Jeff decided to spend some time running bugs through quicker staging areas, pockets, and dumps.  Their decision to concentrate efforts on that type of water paid off immensely as a number of fish were hooked and landed in this transitional water.

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I know that I have been told several times by folks much more knowledgeable than myself that water temperatures are only 1 part of the equation in regards to fish behavior – but I neglected to heed that advice, and most likely missed out on several opportunities to encounter steelhead during the day as a result.


Flame Thrower

Guys, this is happening.  I’m building one this weekend.  I need to fish – so do you.  I’ll do my part to make that happen.   Flame Thrower Plans (If you are part of the NSA or Homeland Security – I’m kidding….I think)

 


Mending

Gink and Gasoline has a fantastic article over at their blogsite that I encourage everyone to check out.  The article simplifies and gives a great overview of proper mending and controlling line during a drift to achieve a natural presentation.

This skill is something that took awhile for myself (and I’m sure others) to fully understand and master.  However, once some common misconceptions (mentioned in the G&G article) were overcome, it all became much easier.

One of the biggest things that helped me is to over-exaggerate the mend, and don’t be afraid to move the indicator back up the stream – it allows the bugs to drop in under the indicator and be properly positioned for the downstream drift.

Here’s a good video of proper mending


Don’t Bring a Knife to a Gun Fight

We owe it to the fish to be responsible anglers and choose a rod weight that is able to properly handle the intended species of fish.  It always amazes me that anglers will take to social media channels and other forms of communication to boast about intentionally targeting and catching a steelhead (or other large species of fish) on exceptionally light weight gear/tackle.  In my opinion, purposely targeting larger fish on extremely light rods is extremely irresponsible to the fish and is no reason for celebration.

Targeting fish with undersized rods and equipment causes a great amount of undue stress on the fish during the fight.  I completely understand the “thrill of the fight” and the sense of accomplishment that is gained by landing large fish on light tackle – but the feeling of self gratification should not be greater than our sense of responsibility.

Sometimes an 8wt rod feels like its not enough for steelhead.

Sometimes an 8wt rod feels like its not enough for steelhead.

Here is an excerpt from a study conducted by the Rhode Island Sea Grant: Fish that are caught and released may die for several reasons, but the two primary causes are stress and wounding. Stress results from the fish fighting after being hooked. Internally, the physical exertion causes an oxygen deficit in the tissues, forcing the muscles to function anaerobically (without oxygen). This causes lactic acid to build up in the muscle tissue, and then to diffuse into the blood. Lactic acid acts as an acid in the blood, causing the pH of the blood to drop. Even slight changes in pH can cause major disruptions of the metabolic processes, ultimately killing the fish. If the fish is quickly released, its blood pH usually returns to normal and the fish will be unaffected. Some fish, after a long tow, may appear to live once released, but the imbalance in the blood chemistry may kill them as late as three days after being caught. In most cases, the means of preventing this type of mortality is to not keep the fish in action for a long period of time, unless the intent is to keep it.

Sometimes an incidental catch happens – once in a while a steelhead may linger in the river longer than others and surprise an angler targeting trout, it happens.  However, in those situations where we are going out for big fish, please consider your gear and make sure that proper consideration is given to landing the fish as quickly and safely as possible.  Also, remember just because you saw a fish swim away and it “looked fine” doesn’t mean that it will survive.


To Bead or Not to Bead – That is the Question

Trout Beads

It has become exceptionally apparent that there is a growing division between anglers that use beads to target migratory and resident species of fish in the Great Lakes watersheds.  For all intents and purposes I am taking a completely and totally neutral stance on this (at least officially) – however I want to encourage a healthy discussion about the topic and use this blog to collect feedback and data.  So please participate in the poll and leave a message in the comment section.  Please try and keep it under control, and engage in a healthy conversation.


Drops

Drops suck.  For me, a dropped fish on the swing is more painful and unforgettable than one lost with any other method.  Maybe it’s because only so many fish will run down a swung fly or that the rig, from backing to the big hook dangling on my intruder, should stick and stop a school bus.  Standing in the run with nothing but dejection and disappointment plain sucks.  So, what do we do other than check the rig, take a pull from the flask, and get back at it?  I’ve been asking that question a lot lately after dropping fish after fish last fall.  A few things have come to mind that I think are worth sharing.

First off, try to play some scenarios through your mind of how you plan to land a fish in a particular run before you get into the fight.  Let’s face it, there’s plenty of time to check the lay of the land between casts when swinging.  Use some of that time to consider the best way to get the fish to hand or, at least, how to avoid the things that will put a quick end to the fight and maybe the outing.  Think about that log upstream from you that could make things rough if the fish runs upstream or the hole that will swallow you up if you decide to head down with the fish.  If you are in a boat talk about what the plan is if / when you get one on that can’t be horsed in without pulling anchor.

Second, during the fight try to keep the angle of the rod low, especially when the fish is close, and change directions on the fish from time to time working to keep downstream pressure when possible.  Bob pointed out from that video that I maintained the same upstream pressure on that fish for over 2 minutes (most of that video was chopped off).  In fear of letting the fish take me down and into deeper water I buried my feet, cranked the drag up, and decided to play tug-of-war.

Last, bring a net.  Yes, it’s cool to tail fish and I’ve done that plenty but that last minute of the fight can get pretty dicey if you have to tail it yourself.  A switch rod or a spey can get pretty awkward when you have fish up close.  It took me 2 rods breaking before I realized I needed a different strategy.  Also, fighting the fish until the fight is gone and its floating is no way to treat the fish.  Too much lactic acid in the fish will send it to the turtle buffet even after you see it swim off.  There are some great smaller nets that won’t break the bank.  Get one

Get a game plan, be smart about fighting the fish, and put it in the bag when it’s all over.  I’m convinced I would have brought more to hand last year if I had taken a different approach.  The swing game is rough, give yourself a chance and get the fish back in good shape.